FAQ: Is Japanese Difficult? Do You Have to Be Really Smart to Learn It?

FAQ: Is Japanese Difficult? Do You Have to Be Really Smart to Learn It?

While at a Christmas dinner party recently, I was asked the standard American icebreaker: “So, what do you do?” “I’m a linguist and an author who writes about language learning.”
“Oh? What languages do you speak?” “I’ve dabbled in a few, but I mostly focus on Japanese.” “Wow, that’s a really hard language! You must be really smart.” I knew this exclamation was coming since it’s the same response I almost always get when talking about language learning, but it still makes me cringe every time. Many people, even those who have never studied the language, assume that ① Japanese is difficult, and ② you have to be really smart to learn it.
So is Japanese difficult? And does it require great intelligence? Read on to see my answer to both.

Interview with Luca Lampariello, Polyglot, Language Coach & Co-Founder of LinguaCore

Interview with Luca Lampariello, Polyglot, Language Coach & Co-Founder of LinguaCore

In today’s show, I chat with the man, the legend, the one and only, Italian polyglot Luca Lampariello. Over the past 20 years, Luca has reached a very high level in 9 foreign languages: English, French, German, Spanish, Swedish, Russian, Dutch, Portuguese, and Mandarin Chinese. Luca is full useful tips and strategies, which he shares in depth at his blog, The Polyglot Dream. In the interview, we discuss: 1) How Luca got interested in languages. 2) Procedural vs declarative memory. 3) The weakness of rote memorization. 4) How to train your brain to learn better. 5) The myth that you have to be a genius to learn lots of languages. 6) The myth that you have to learn a lot of words to become fluent. 7) The myth that just reading or listening a lot will make you a better speaker. 8) The ability to translate and communicate are very different things. 9) Whether there is a proper order of acquisition for foreign language skills. 10) The myth that polyglots can speak all their languages perfectly. 11) The importance of maintaining previously learned languages as you take on another. 12) Luca’s daily language learning and maintenance routine. 13) The myth that intensity always equals speed. 14) Luca’s favorite tools for different stages of learning.

Interview with Ellen Jovin of “Words & Worlds of New York”

Interview with Ellen Jovin of “Words & Worlds of New York”

Ellen Jovin is variously described as a “linguaphile,” a “language-crazed writer,” a “grammar freak,” a “former freelance writer,” and a professional trainer specializing in communication skills. On the first of July in 2009, Ellen began a impressive language and culture project called “Words & Worlds of New York” with the goal exploring the myriad languages spoken in The Big Apple.

Are Outdated Methods & Boring Materials Making You a Language Learning Masochist?

Are Outdated Methods & Boring Materials Making You a Language Learning Masochist?

The Internet has blessed modern language learners with unprecedented access to foreign language tools, materials, and native speakers. Assuming they can get online, even a farmhand in rural Kansas can learn Japanese for free using Skype, YouTube, and Lang-8. But language learning luddites and technophobes scoff at these modern miracles. Like Charleton Heston clutching his proverbial rifle, they desperately cling to tradition for tradition’s sake, criticizing these modern tools—and the modern methods they enable—from their offline hideouts. Communicating via messenger pigeon and smoke signals no doubt. “Technology is for for lazy learners!” they exclaim. “Real language learners,” they insist, use the classroom-based, textbook-driven, rote-memory-laden techniques of old. I call bullshit. Read on to see why.

Pin It on Pinterest