Don’t Wait for the “Right Time” to Learn a Language. The Right Time is Now O’Clock.

Don’t Wait for the “Right Time” to Learn a Language. The Right Time is Now O’Clock.

Lots of people want to learn a foreign language, but the desire often gets buried by distractions and procrastination. We think to ourselves, “I will start learning Japanese once I finish this busy project at work.” This is just like the promise many of us make to “start eating well after the holidays” or to “start giving to charity when we can afford it.” We feel a little better in the moment by outsourcing responsibility and sacrifice to the future, but when that future comes, the procrastinated action rarely comes with it. We finish that busy project at work, and fill our new-found free time mindlessly scrolling through Instagram instead of opening the Fluent Forever app. The holidays come and go, and we find our mouth full of pizza and beer instead of veggies and salmon. We get a bonus at work, but let lifestyle inflation use up the surplus instead of sending a check to Give Well. No, the future does not hold any magical power to make your dreams come true. But the now does—if you are willing to prioritize and take action.

You Can’t Skip the Suck, But You Can Overcome It

You Can’t Skip the Suck, But You Can Overcome It

I believe in making language learning as fun as possible. Why? Because fun is fuel. And fun is, well, fun! The more you enjoy the journey, the more likely you are to keep going day after day. But “fun” doesn’t necessarily mean “easy.” The truth is that there is no completely pain-free path up Language Mountain. There is no route that lets you completely skip the “suck.” While I hope you will enjoy most of your language learning journey by choosing modern materials, topics you love, and effective self-guided immersion activities, you will inevitably encounter days when you are unmotivated to put in the work or are too scared to step outside of your comfort zone. When this happens, chasing fun is not enough. You have to rely on two decidedly less fun alternatives: developing discipline and facing your fears. I know, I know, not exactly a recipe for a party. But this is a recipe for long-term success.

The 4 Stages of Language Learning Competence

The 4 Stages of Language Learning Competence

The journey to full fluency in a foreign language can be roughly divided into what psychologists call the four stages of competence: Unconscious Incompetence, Conscious Incompetence, Conscious Competence, and Unconscious Competence. You can think of progress through the stages like climbing up a mountain peak all the way from sea level. Read on to learn more about the stages and how to keep going when the going gets tough.

Define Your “Why” for Learning a Language

Define Your “Why” for Learning a Language

Creating and sustaining motivation is one of the biggest challenges in language learning. And the single most powerful way I know to get and stay motivated is having a big, chewy, powerful “why” for learning the language―a driving purpose that keeps you putting one foot in front of the other no matter how steep the trail may get. Flimsy feelings like “It would kinda be cool to speak a foreign language” or “maybe this language will be useful in my career someday” won’t cut it. Why? Because when the going gets tough, you’ll quit. You won’t have the psychological fuel to keep going. To succeed in language learning, your “why” has to be: ① strong, ② emotional, ③ personal, and ④ immediate. Like Friedrich Nietzsche put it, you can bear almost any how if you have a strong enough why.

Why Ego is the Enemy in Language Learning

Why Ego is the Enemy in Language Learning

As Richard Feynman said, “The first principle is that you must not fool yourself—and you are the easiest person to fool.” Many of us tend to think we are better than we really are. Better drivers. Better employees. Better lovers. And yes, better language learners. But perhaps just as many struggle with the exact opposite problem: feeling worse than we really are. Worse drivers. Worse employees. Worse lovers. And yes, worse language learners. Why is it so damn easy to delude ourselves one way or the other? The answer is “ego.” Read on to learn the 3 ways ego holds language learners back and how to best overcome it.

Interview with Randy Hunt of “Fluent Every Year”

Interview with Randy Hunt of “Fluent Every Year”

Randy is on a mission to learn a new language fluently every year. His current project is Italian, with Lithuanian as a side-project saved for weekend fun. Randy has his language-learning head screwed on tightly, and I firmly agree with his contention that learners can reach “conversational fluency” (the ability to talk with native speakers on a variety of topics) in a year if you spend enough time doing the right things. As we both have observed, most learners neither spend enough time nor do the right things.

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