The Top 10 Tips for Becoming a “Local Laowai” in China

The Top 10 Tips for Becoming a “Local Laowai” in China

If you will visiting or moving to China, you would do yourself—and those you meet—a big favor by memorizing these top ten tips from Learn Mandarin Now: 1) Learn at least a little Mandarin. 2) Avoid fake taxis. 3) Prepare yourself to use squatty potties. 4) Avoid taboo topics: politics, Tibet, Taiwan, human rights, and Internet censorship. 5) Learn to bargain (the national sport!) 6) Cash is king. 7) Don’t refer to elderly individuals by their name. 8) Never stick chopsticks in your rice bowl. 9) The number 4 is bad luck. 10) Avoid bad luck gifts like clocks, white wrapping, and green hats. Read on to learn more about each.

The Top 10 Ways to Learn Mandarin Chinese (From 50+ Top Bloggers)

The Top 10 Ways to Learn Mandarin Chinese (From 50+ Top Bloggers)

Learn Mandarin Now asked over 50 language bloggers (including yours truly) to list their 3 favorite tools for learning Mandarin Chinese. They then combined all the results into the super sexy infographic below and a comprehensive post (available on their site). What are your favorite tools? Any must-haves not listed here?

The Global Guide to Hand Gestures

The Global Guide to Hand Gestures

While being able to understand, speak, read, and write world languages is usually the primary focus of language learners, we musn’t forget the importance of non-verbal communication cues like hand gestures. Even with impeccable pronunciation and perfect grammar, you may inadvertently offend someone using “false friend” gestures from your home culture that have wildly different connotations abroad: 1) In Japan, for example, I saw the shock on a British friend’s face when he first saw Japanese students pose for a picture. Many young Japanese think it’s cute to use backwards peace signs, unaware that it means “f*ck you” to people from the U.K., Ireland, Australia, and New Zealand! 2) In Bangladesh, I made a serious gaff when trying to congratulate my team for a job well done: I didn’t know at the time that in that part of the world, a thumbs up means “up yours”, not “great job” as it does in the U.S. To avoid making a fool of yourself like I tend to do so well, spend some time familiarizing yourself with the following infographic that details many of the most common hand gestures around the world.

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